RaceEconomics: How Much Can Be Blamed on Discrimination?

RaceEconomics How Much Can Be Blamed on Discrimination Walter E Williams applies an economic analysis to the problems black Americans have faced in the past and still face in the present to show that that free market resource allocation as opposed to pol

  • Title: RaceEconomics: How Much Can Be Blamed on Discrimination?
  • Author: Walter E. Williams
  • ISBN: 9780817912444
  • Page: 201
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Walter E Williams applies an economic analysis to the problems black Americans have faced in the past and still face in the present to show that that free market resource allocation, as opposed to political allocation, is in the best interests of minorities Contrasting the features of market resource allocation with those of the political arena, he explains how, in the Walter E Williams applies an economic analysis to the problems black Americans have faced in the past and still face in the present to show that that free market resource allocation, as opposed to political allocation, is in the best interests of minorities Contrasting the features of market resource allocation with those of the political arena, he explains how, in the political arena, minorities cannot realize a particular preference unless they win the will of the majority In the market, he shows, there is a sort of parity nonexistent in the political arena in which one person s dollar has the same power as the next person s Williams debunks many common labor market myths and reveals how the minimum wage law has imposed incalculable harm on the most disadvantaged members of our society He explains that the real problem is that people are not so much underpaid as underskilled and that the real task is to help unskilled people become skilled The author also reveals how licensing and regulation reduce economic opportunities for people, especially those who might be described as discriminated against and having little political clout Using the examples of the taxi cab and trucking industries before and after deregulation, he illustrates how government regulation closes entry and reinforces economic handicaps, whereas deregulation not only has helped minorities enter industries in greater numbers but also has benefited consumers.

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      Published :2020-01-02T12:41:09+00:00

    About “Walter E. Williams

    • Walter E. Williams

      Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Dr Walter E Williams holds a B.A in economics from California State University, Los Angeles, and M.A and Ph.D degrees in economics from UCLA He also holds a Doctor of Humane Letters from Virginia Union University and Grove City College, Doctor of Laws from Washington and Jefferson College and Doctor Honoris Causa en Ciencias Sociales from Universidad Francisco Marroquin, in Guatemala, where he is also Professor Honorario.Dr Williams has served on the faculty of George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, as John M Olin Distinguished Professor of Economics, since 1980 from 1995 to 2001, he served as department chairman He has also served on the faculties of Los Angeles City College, California State University Los Angeles, and Temple University in Philadelphia, and Grove City College, Grove City, Pa.Dr Williams is the author of over 150 publications which have appeared in scholarly journals such as Economic Inquiry, American Economic Review, Georgia Law Review, Journal of Labor Economics, Social Science Quarterly, and Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy and popular publications such as Newsweek, Ideas on Liberty, National Review, Reader s Digest, Cato Journal, and Policy Review He has authored six books America A Minority Viewpoint, The State Against Blacks, which was later made into the PBS documentary Good Intentions, All It Takes Is Guts, South Africa s War Against Capitalism, which was later revised for South African publication, Do the Right Thing The People s Economist Speaks, and More Liberty Means Less Government.He has made scores of radio and television appearances which include Nightline, Firing Line, Face the Nation, Milton Friedman s Free To Choose, Crossfire, MacNeil Lehrer, Wall Street Week and was a regular commentator for Nightly Business Report He is also occasional substitute host for the Rush Limbaugh show In addition Dr Williams writes a nationally syndicated weekly column that is carried by approximately 140 newspapers and several web sites.Dr Williams serves on several boards of directors Grove City College, Reason Foundation and Hoover Institution He serves on numerous advisory boards including Cato Institute, Landmark Legal Foundation, Institute of Economic Affairs, and Heritage Foundation.Dr Williams has received numerous fellowships and awards including Foundation for Economic Education Adam Smith Award, Hoover Institution National Fellow, Ford Foundation Fellow, Valley Forge Freedoms Foundation George Washington Medal of Honor, Veterans of Foreign Wars U.S News Media Award, Adam Smith Award, California State University Distinguished Alumnus Award, George Mason University Faculty Member of the Year, and Alpha Kappa Psi Award.Dr Williams has participated in numerous debates, conferences and lectures in the United States and abroad He has frequently given expert testimony before Congressional committees on public policy issues ranging from labor policy to taxation and spending He is a member of the Mont Pelerin Society, and the American Economic Association.

    922 thoughts on “RaceEconomics: How Much Can Be Blamed on Discrimination?

    • (kindle version)t listed and i'm not fluent in listing(this is incredible! there are situations documented here that are nothing less thanrrrrr! aggravating and angering!updatee scenario williams describes has a happy ending, or sorts. freedom cabs now, or at the time of the writing, exists and works for a living. 39% kindle.)saw this title in a column from thomas sowell. of, or recommended. dunno about tom, but i figure to give it a look see:1st sentence, preface:racial issues often give rise t [...]


    • A former student sent me this book because she thought I would find it interesting. It's interesting like the books by Richard Rodriguez, Shelby Steele, and Dinesh D'Souza. Like them, Williams is a nonwhite academic/writer who gives bigots cover by arguing that our problems are not caused by racism. He uses statistics that raise more questions than they answer, false analogies, and logical fallacies to argue against the minimum wage, unions, and government regulations while arguing for racial pr [...]


    • Following the footsteps of Dr. Thomas Sowell, Dr. Williams looked at the race and economics in a more economic terms rather than the historical analysis of Dr. Sowell. Does discrimination exist? Yes it does, but discrimination has a cost as Dr. Sowell has written in Basic Economics, it is those who enable the status quo of discrimination through the means of legislation that further propagate discrimination. From slavery, unions to politicians and academia, the more they try to fix the problem t [...]


    • A very interesting look at the history of African Americans and the economic successes and failures (mainly in the early 20th century). Main thesis is the free market punishes discrimination due to the ability to hire low-skilled workers for less. Strong emphasis on the effect of minimum wage, licensing and unions as detrimental to the economic success of African Americans (and were often openly racist in the early 20th century).Sees the issues of poverty in the African American community as the [...]




    • A well researched and challenging bookI highly enjoyed this book, as it has caused me to explore race and how we “get ahead” or stay stuck. The author seemed to have done a good deal of historical research, and explained common ideas about race and prejudice and how the barriers faced today are more than just prejudice (though to be clear I believe strongly these exist). My background is in clinical social work and I currently practice psychotherapy. Though I don’t work with African Americ [...]


    • Great book! Very informative, professor Williams provides a lot of information in a short amount of pages. He really pushes home the point that intentions really mean little to the actual outcomes of policy.


    • Basic economics. free markets almost always help everyone more than race based laws with good intentions which have actually hurt the poor and minorities.


    • Great analysisA great treatise by one of my favorite authors and economists. Insightful, great analogies, clearly stated arguments. Much better than the bs that we get in the press and in government analysis.


    • So many relevant topics to today's discussions, a great read for anyone interested in economics. "Everybody likes a monopoly in what they sell and competition in what they buy." "The more difficult problem lies in the political arena: how to reduce or eliminate the power of interest groups to use governments to exclude?"


    • George Mason economist, Walter Williams, applies conservative/libertarian economic analysis to issues of race discrimination in the United States. For example, he argues that minimum wage laws disproportionately impacted black employees. Before the minimum wage, they could combat racist hiring practices and an (on average) lower skill level by working for lower wages. This would give them experience to develop the skills to compete, and market forces would drive wages closer to equality. He take [...]


    • What sets this book on the top shelf of economics for me is the author's ability to look past the broken record of the oppression narrative concerning race and economics, and to offer deep insight into the history of various minorities in the United States. Dr. Williams uses clear language which everyone can understand - for example, he will talk about the decreased number of mutually beneficial transactions which take place rather than Dead-weight Loss, and so on. Also, the primary focus on the [...]


    • A very academic argument in favor of open/free market dynamics, how law has been used to limit market dynamics, and the impact.Interesting argument, worth discussion, but very academic presentation making this a non-compelling read.


    • Williams makes a strong case for how minimum wage laws, unions, and licensing reduces options and opportunities for certain races. But when he starts to condone that employers and clubs should be able to have the freedom to discriminate on the basis of race, I had trouble buying his argument.






    • Written for the layman, tightly argued and supported with facts. Presented new ideas that changed my thinking.


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